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Tag Archives: intermittency

The Helm energy cost review

By Dave Elliott

In his wide-ranging review of energy costs for the UK government, Dieter Helm says ‘the cost of energy is too high, and higher than necessary to meet the Climate Change Act (CCA) target and the carbon budgets. Households and businesses have not fully benefited from the falling costs of gas and coal, the rapidly falling costs of renewables, or from the efficiency gains to network and supply costs which come from smart technologies. Prices should be falling, and they should go on falling into the medium and longer terms’.  And he sets out his ideas for enabling that to happen.                   (more…)

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100% Renewables? Mostly nonsense!

by Dave Elliott

So says a new study by a group of mostly pro-nuclear academics, who look critically at some of the many ‘100% renewables’ global or regional energy scenarios that have emerged in recent years. 24 were deemed to have forecast regional, national or global energy requirements in sufficient detail to be considered potentially credible but, on inspection, none were considered to have provided convincing evidence that basic feasibility criteria, in relation to energy supply reliability, grids and balancing, could be met. (more…)

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The last word on the cost of balancing renewables

By Dave Elliott

The UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC) has produced an update to its 2006 report that had looked at the costs and impacts of using ‘intermittent’ electricity from renewables such as wind and solar. The 2006 study had only examined impacts with up to a 20% input, but the UKERC researchers now say that, even at the higher levels we are now expecting, it was still the case that the costs of balancing renewables could be low. However, they warned that, unless ‘urgent’ action was taken by the government to boost grid flexibility, the costs of adding renewables in future will be ‘much higher than they need to be’.

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Balancing green power

By Dave Elliott

If the use of renewables is to expand further, ways have to be found of compensating for their variability. Fortunately there are many, as I have outlined in a new book ‘Balancing green power’, produced for the Institute of Physics. It sets out to show how, taken together, they can help balance grid systems as increasing amounts of renewable capacity is added, helping to avoid wasteful curtailment of excess output and minimising the cost of grid balancing. The options include flexible generation plants, energy storage systems, smart grid demand management and supergrid imports and exports.

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Energy system integration costs cut

By Dave Elliott

Imperial College London and the NERA consultancy have produced studies of energy system integration costs and grid balancing options for the government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change. They focus on flexible generation and backup systems and conclude that ‘flexibility can significantly reduce the integration cost of intermittent renewables, to the point where their whole-system cost makes them a more attractive expansion option than CCS and/or nuclear’.

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Grid balancing ‘needs extra firm capacity’

By Dave Elliott

Even ‘very significant’ storage, demand-side measures and interconnection would not be sufficient to cope with intermittency in a weather-dependent renewables-based electricity system, according to modeling, up to 2030, by the Energy Research Partnership (ERP). It says there would still be a need to have a significant amount of zero-carbon firm capacity on the system too – for dark, windless periods. It could, for example, be supplied by nuclear, biomass or fossil fuel plants with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS).

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Europe and supergrids – balancing grids across the EU

By Dave Elliott

A pan-European supergrid network could play a major role in helping Europe achieve an ambitious 45% share of renewable energy by 2030 at low extra cost, by balancing grids and limiting curtailment,  according to a new Greenpeace report,  PowE[R]2030, based on analysis by Energynautics, and using data from the International Energy Agency.

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Balancing variable renewables- capacity markets, smart grids or super grids?

By Dave Elliott

The previous few posts have looked at the state of play with renewables in some key countries. In many cases an urgent issue is grid integration and balancing. The variable outputs from wind and PV solar outputs are balanced on some grid systems by using existing fossil-fueled plants, but the later are having a hard time competing, now that some of their peak market has been taken over by low marginal cost (zero fuel cost) wind and PV. To ensure that there is enough capacity still available capacity markets have been proposed, offering extra payments. Some critics don’t like the sound of that- it’s yet another subsidy, in effect for fossil fuel. However, the proposed UK version includes payment for energy storage and demand management options, as well as for gas-fired back up plants, and longer term, fossil gas might be replaced by green gas in the latter. There again there are other balancing options- supergrid links for example, which would open up a new multi-national balancing market.  Which option is best? (more…)

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IEA on energy costs

by Dave Elliott

Renewable energy may supply more electricity than natural gas and twice as much as  nuclear globally by 2016, due to declining costs and growing demand in emerging markets, according to the International Energy Agency.

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Wind power reliability

by Dave Elliott

Earlier this year (26/6/13) Daily Telegraph columnist Geoffrey Lean said that ‘it has become an article of popular faith that building wind farms also involves constructing fossil-fuelled power stations for back‑up when the weather is calm. As a result, some opponents go on to say, wind turbines do little or nothing to cut carbon dioxide emissions’.  But he reported that the National Grid says that, although between April 2011 and September 2012 wind produced some 23,700 gigawatt hours of electricity, only 22GWh of power from fossil fuels was needed to fill the gaps when the wind didn’t blow- under 0.1%. Moreover this standby burning of fossil fuels only reduced the emission saving from having wind on the grid by 0.081%. He commented ‘not surprisingly, given these figures, no new fossil‑fuel power station has been built to provide back‑up for wind farms, and none is in prospect’.

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