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Tag Archives: carbon capture and storage

Energy transitions in the UK

By Dave Elliott

The UK energy transition is progressing quite well on the electricity side, despite on-shore wind being constrained, but less progress has been made on green heat. A new Energy Research Partnership report on decarbonising heat, Transition to low-carbon heat’, looks at the technical, social, financial and governance aspects and highlights the key actions that need to be taken now and in the next few years. ERP says that ‘supplying natural gas or oil directly into homes will need to be replaced by a decarbonised gas or by electric heating or heat network. But it is not a simple choice: each option has challenges that could limit their deployment. A combination of options is likely to be required; no one option may not dominate, as natural gas currently does. Demand reduction will be an essential part of a cost-effective transition’.

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BECCS: 10% of UK energy & net carbon cuts

By Dave Elliott

Bioenergy use combined with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) can deliver negative emissions, i.e. the net removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, whilst producing energy in the form of electricity, heat, gaseous and liquid fuels, according to the UK Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) in a new study. Some have serious doubts about the cost, viability, impacts and reliability of large scale carbon capture and storage (CCS). Some also see it as a diversion from proper mitigation measures such as renewables and as just a way to allow for continued use of fossil fuels. But some environmentalists are keen on BECCS as a green option that might redeem CCS, if it works. Then again some environmentalists are unhappy with large scale biomass combustion, especially if using imported wood pellets, and so oppose BECCS.

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Energy system integration costs cut

By Dave Elliott

Imperial College London and the NERA consultancy have produced studies of energy system integration costs and grid balancing options for the government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change. They focus on flexible generation and backup systems and conclude that ‘flexibility can significantly reduce the integration cost of intermittent renewables, to the point where their whole-system cost makes them a more attractive expansion option than CCS and/or nuclear’.

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UK energy policy – grinding to a halt?

By Dave Elliott

At a meeting of the House of Commons Liaison Committee, which brings together the chairs of select committees, PM David Cameron in effect provided an overview of his take on key aspects of UK energy policy. It was quite revealing, with justifications being offered for the extensive cut-backs in support for most low-carbon projects, in order ‘to deliver low carbon at the lowest cost’. Very little seems to have survived unscathed. (more…)

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Biomass and renewable gas

By Dave Elliott

Not everyone backs biomass, given the emission/biodiversity/land-use issues, but  biomass does offer a range of flexible green fuel options, biogas especially.  The World Bioenergy Association (WBA) says bioenergy already contributes over 14% to the global energy mix, and its use is bound to expand.  So what are the options? (more…)

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Facts and fiction

By Dave Elliott

Is the truth out there? An extended Xmas Whimsy

It’s usual for there to be a spread of viewpoints on most issues, and it’s always worth looking at a range views, including ‘outlier’ ones! On that, this is fun: www.xonitek.com/press-room/company-news/the-stone-age-didnt-end-because-they-ran-out-of-stones/

However at times you can get weary of obsessive time wasters and yearn for clarity! Sadly that may not be easy to achieve.

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A world of trouble

A World of Troubles

by Dave Elliott

With the typhoon disaster in the Philippines, Japan’s cut back on its climate targets and Australia abandoning its climate policy, the latest gathering of the Conference of Parties of the UN Framework Convention of Climate Change in Poland last October was a rather gloomy affair. The Fifth report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change had reinforced a key message from the basic science- it was now 95 % certain that climate change was caused by human activities, up from 90% previously. And the results were likely to be serious. The United Nations Environment Programme then issued a warning that if countries failed to take immediate steps to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the global temperature will be significantly more likely to rise above 2˚C.

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CfD – early winners

By Dave Elliott

The UK’s new  Contracts for a Difference system will replace the Renewables Obligation fully from 2017, but before then some green energy projects will be supported under it. 16 have been earmarked for consideration for this early support under the Final Investment Decision (FID) ‘Enabling for Renewables’ process.

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World Energy Council- get real

By Dave Elliott

The World Energy Council (WEC) has called for policymakers and industry leaders to ‘get real’ on global energy policy, claiming that the global financial crisis, Fukushima, and the development of unconventional hydrocarbons has changed the context and that, as a consequence, the CO2 targets for 2050 will be missed, unless significant changes and policy frameworks are adopted. (more…)

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EGU 2012: going green on (and under) the ground

By Liz Kalaugher

The thousands of delegates congregating in Vienna this year will find the EGU making further efforts to “green” the meeting – badge lanyards are made from bamboo fibre rather than PET and the conference schedule is smaller to save paper. It seems only appropriate, since many of the sessions at the conference will focus on the cryosphere (shrinking), climate (warming), natural resources (under pressure) and energy. But are such measures just a drop in the ocean, especially as environmental issues appear to have fallen down the priority list for many governments?

Indeed, governments received a call for action within the first half hour of the conference opening, with Millie Basava-Reddi of the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas R&D programme (IEAGHG) stressing the need for investment in carbon storage, in her talk presented by session chair Michael Kühn due to a delayed flight.

While the G8 nations would like to see 20 carbon capture and storage projects up and running by 2020, the IEA target is 100 by 2020 and 3,400 by 2050. The agency’s latest assessment, however, indicates that while 20 projects are feasible for 2020 its own roadmap isn’t, with just 50 projects likely by 2025. Worldwide there are currently 14 large-scale integrated projects in operation or execution; 2011 saw 74 large-scale projects in at least the planning stage. Basava-Reddi called on governments to allow for long project lead times – up to fifteen years – and to help to provide up-front investment.

The challenges for carbon capture and storage in many cases mirror those for other subsurface technologies such as geothermal energy. Indeed Kühn’s group at the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Germany, is researching how brine extraction from saline aquifers could help reduce the pressure rise induced by the addition of carbon dioxide, whilst at the same time providing geothermal heat.

There are a large number of issues in geothermal energy that need substantial research efforts, explained Adele Manzella of CNR Institute for Geosciences and Earth Resources, Italy. The upper 3 km of the Earth’s crust could provide 60,000 times our current power consumption; the only snag is where and how to access that power. The up-front costs are high and it’s hard to forecast production, especially since there is a lack of data on geothermal potential. But once systems are set up the energy produced is cheap compared with other types of renewable energy, since power is provided 24 hours a day.

The European Energy Research Alliance has set up a Joint Programme on Geothermal Energy, said Manzella. Areas under study include assessing Europe’s resources for geothermal power, how to mitigate induced seismicity in reservoirs, and high-performance drilling.

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