Category Archives: Renew your energy

Powering Africa

By Dave Elliott

Over the last ten years or so there has been a concerted effort to support the use of renewable energy in less developed countries. The long term aim has been to reduce emissions from the use of fossil fuels, but shorter term aims include providing energy sources for the many who are currently off the power grid. Thus the UN’s Sustainable Development goals include providing ‘affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all’, with projects being supported across the developing world under the Sustainable Energy for All programme, and Africa being a major focus.

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India and Japan press ahead – South Korea too

By Dave Elliott

Although renewables are still nowhere near as advanced in India as in China (see my last post), where they are now at over 550 GW including hydro, India had got to 91 GW by the end of 2016, and is expanding fast, with 29 GW of wind capacity in place. It’s the same in Japan, although, with the post-Fukushima nuclear mess still often dominating the news, less is heard about that. But by the end of 2016 it had 72 GW of renewables, including 45 GW of PV solar. And the prospects for growth of renewable capacity are good in both countries. (more…)

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China – even more renewables

By Dave Elliott

China continues to be a global leader in renewables. The nation has more wind power (now at 169 GW) and solar PV (over 100 GW) than any other country and, on 2016 data, a world-beating 554GW of renewables in all, including hydro. There is more to come. The 13th Five Year Plan (2015-2020) proposed targets for energy efficiency, the reduction of carbon intensity and diversification away from fossil fuels, with non-fossil fuels providing 15% of primary energy consumption by 2020, up from 7.4% in 2005.  But China’s National Energy Administration (NEA) is also considering raising the 2020 solar target to 150 GW, which would lead to about 21 GW of annual installation between 2016 and 2020. The Five Year Plan also proposed to increase the installed capacity of wind to 250 GW by 2020.

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US: energy in La La land

By Dave Elliott

It is hard to know what will happen in the energy and climate policy area in the USA under Donald Trump’s presidency. Before his election he had famously rubbished climate change as a fraud and was clearly pretty hostile to renewables – and all things green. In office he has set about cutting support for climate-related US policies and has announced withdrawal from the COP21 Paris climate agreement. He has also sought cuts in government support for renewables in the US. But although federal support is important, many programmes are run at the state level and states may resist his directives. Companies may do too – renewables are increasingly profitable investments, and an area of rapid growth: just the sort of thing you would imagine he would like.

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Scotland shows the way forward

By Dave Elliott

Scotland is now generating the equivalent of around 60% of its annual electricity needs from renewables, mostly wind, and is aiming for 100%, with new nuclear blocked unilaterally. So it is a little surprising that there have not been more studies of this unique initiative. That’s soon to change with a new book, ‘A critical review of Scottish Energy Policy’ by a group of Scottish academics edited by Geoff Wood and Keith Baker, to be published by Palgrave next month. It focuses on renewables and low carbon options and related policy, planning, legislation and regulation issues.

It is a very timely publication, given that, after Brexit, Scotland may vote to go fully independent. It is already quite independent, with its own devolved government and a clearly different and very progressive energy policy. What’s not to like? Well not everything is ideal, as this new book explains. But the overwhelming message is that, despite the endless debate about whether renewables can work large-scale, here’s a country actually doing it.

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UK – not a lost cause

By Dave Elliott

Some see the current UK government’s energy policy as doomed – trapped in a commitment to old technology like nuclear power, leavened only by continued support for offshore wind. For example, the FT ran this analysis: ‘Nobody outside the industry now thinks the future of electricity generation is nuclear fission. The cost of building the plants to comply with safety and antiterrorism standards is rising all the time, fears of a runaway price for oil and gas now look silly, while advances in wind and solar technology are destroying those projections of ever-dearer energy … The UK’s energy market is in an unholy mess, with attention distracted by the vacuous debate about switching electricity suppliers. The real costs lie with the “green initiatives” at the other end of the wires. Scrapping Hinkley Point would not solve all of them, but it would be a start. Perhaps best to wait until after June 8 for another U-turn from Mrs May, though.’  FT 26th May

Well, the June election came and went and that didn’t really resolve much in the energy sector or, arguably, elsewhere. However, while Labour may not have won enough seats to overturn the Conservatives, it did very well, and it is likely to play a significant role in the future, given the hung parliament. What might it do?

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EU Renewables still boom, but growth slows

By Dave Elliott

The European Union is on track to meet its goal for renewables to supply 20% of its energy by 2020, led by Sweden already at 53.9%, Latvia at 37.6% and Austria at 33%, but with Britain lagging far behind – the UK is at number 24 in the most recent EU 28 league table (for 2015), at 8.2%, only beating Luxembourg (5%), Malta (5.3%), the Netherlands (5.8%) and Belgium (7.9%). The UK may not be missed in this respect, at least, when it leaves the EU.

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Germany’s Energiewende keeps going

By Dave Elliott

Germany is still powering ahead, with renewables supplying over 32% of annual electricity needs and hoping to get to 80% by 2050, with the last nuclear plant phased out by 2022. The nation’s 106GW of renewables briefly supplied 87% of its electricity at one point recently. However, it’s not all plain sailing. Certainly there have been plenty of critical views on its ambitious Energiewende transition programme, some predicting its demise. And, worried about the cost, with an election looming, the government has been slowing it all down. So what lies ahead?

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Balancing renewables in Denmark

By Dave Elliott

Denmark has been at the forefront of the renewable energy revolution and although it has seen some political retrenchment recently, it is still pressing ahead with the next phase,  which includes the need for more grid balancing. It’s mainly a problem of over-supply. Wind and other renewables now supply over 43% of annual power, and that at times means there is too much electricity available. How is that dealt with? (more…)

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Supergrids revisited – but for desert wind not PV solar

By Dave Elliott

Dr Gregor Czisch is a pioneer for the idea of using long-distance supergrids to allow power from widespread sources to be traded across long distances, for example delivering renewable energy harvested in Africa to the EU. Unlike Desertec’s solar-based supergrid plan, his 2011 supergrid plan focused mainly on using wind, which he saw as the best source. That idea has yet to be taken up and Desertec’s CSP/PV plan is also now defunct, but with solar PV costs now having fallen, Czisch has looked at PV again to see if it was now an option. However, he has still found it wanting. And he still looks to wind, including power imported from North Africa, as a better bet.  (more…)

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