Posts by: Dave Elliott

Environmental impact of renewables

By Dave Elliott

Renewable energy technologies are usually considered to have low environmental impacts compared with conventional energy systems. That seems obvious in terms of direct emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – for most renewables (biomass apart) there are none. Similarly for emissions of radioactive materials – none. However, the use of renewable sources does lead to some impacts, most of them being small and local. How can they be assessed and compared?

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Rural and urban energy conflicts

by Dave Elliott

In my last post, I looked at how cities would have to rely in part on imported green power, given their spatial constraints and high energy use, if they want to be fully sustainable. That may worry some environmentalists. It also has social implications for cities and for rural areas, and their interactions, as I will explore in this post. (more…)

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Cities and renewable energy

By Dave Elliott 

Urban areas account for around 75% of the world’s energy use and there are ambitious plans to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. Around the world, cities are beginning to think in terms of meeting their energy needs from renewable sources, so as to limit air pollution and climate change problems.  The case for this transition is strong, not least given the likely rise in air-conditioning demand as climate change impacts more,  and there have been many interesting initiatives launched around the world, often led by city governments.  (more…)

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Labour’s green gas push

By Dave Elliott

‘Turning certain rubbish materials and farm and food waste into various types of biogas – ‘green gas’ – holds the potential to cut costs, radically reduce pollution, and decrease our reliance on imports. Crucially, using more green gas could make a real impact on the decarbonisation of heat without the need to overhaul our national gas pipeline and heat delivery infrastructure and without significant technical barriers’. So say Labour MPs Lisa Nandy and Caroline Flint in the Green Gas book published by the Parliamentary Labour Party Energy and Climate Change Committee.

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Green heat infrastructure

By Dave Elliott

Imperial College has looked at Heat System Decarbonisation (PDF) in the UK in a new report. Provocatively it says solar and biomass heat can only play limited roles for direct space heating, and focuses mainly on three other low carbon system options: a shift to using hydrogen in the gas grid, the use of decarbonized electricity to run heat pumps, and the creation of local heat networks.

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Green heat and energy saving

By Dave Elliott

Heat supply is one of the key weak links in the UK government’s attempt to meet the EU-imposed 15% by 2020 renewable energy target. That target still applies – until the UK finally leaves the EU, if it ever does fully. Although there is talk of green heat networks, for the moment the focus is mostly on direct green heat supply for business and private consumers, and there are some changes underway. The UK’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) has escaped cuts so far. Indeed it is set to expand, but the government wants to restructure it to keep energy costs down for consumers and get better value for money. So, concerned also about impact on food growing, it wants to support the use of food and farm waste-based biomass feedstock rather than crop-based feedstocks for biogas production in Anaerobic Digestion (AD) plants. It has also proposed cutting support for solar heating since it is not seen as good value for taxpayer support.

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Storage will cut renewable balancing cost

By Dave Elliott

Energy storage is all the rage at the moment, with a Daily Telegraph columnist even claiming that ‘cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point’.

And it could be cheap. The recent Carbon Trust/Imperial College report on energy storage says that ‘the UK can realise significant cost savings if market arrangements for the electricity system allow for an efficient deployment and use of energy storage, alongside other flexibility options such as demand response and interconnectors’. It claims that many of the changes needed ‘are likely to be cost neutral and require no additional funding from the government’.

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Nuclear Prospects

By Dave Elliott

‘Supporting early new nuclear projects could lead to higher costs in the short term than continuing to support wind and solar. The cost competitiveness of nuclear power is weakening as wind and solar become more established’. So said the National Audit Office in its recent review of UK nuclear policy: www.nao.org.uk/report/nuclear-power-in-the-uk 

It did, however, say that ‘the decision to proceed with support for nuclear power therefore relies more on strategic than financial grounds: nuclear power is needed in the supply mix to complement the intermittent nature of wind and solar’. That’s an odd view. As the NAO admitted, nuclear is inflexible and cannot balance variable renewables, and the ‘security of supply’ argument may not be as strong as is sometimes claimed. (more…)

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Delivering the goods – clean energy policy

By Dave Elliott

‘Delivering Energy Law and Policy in the EU and the US’, edited by Raphael J. Heffron, Gavin F. M. Little and published by Edinburgh University Press, is a compilation of short chapters from a very wide range of academics that reviews the state of play in the energy policy field in the West. As the editors note, one issue that emerges is the slow progress in relation to the adoption of new cleaner, greener energy options, which they say ‘encourages incumbents and in essence maintains their status’.  The reviews in this book look at what has been done so far and at what could be done to move things on in the future, via new policies and legislation.

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Renewables continue to boom globally

By Dave Elliott

BP says renewables have shown ‘a quicker pace of penetration than any other fuel source in modern history’, and their strong growth meant that they ‘accounted for all of the increase in global power generation in 2015’. BP’s latest review of world energy trends carbon notes that wind power capacity grew by 17.4% and solar by 32.6% last year, with China overtaking Germany and the US as the largest solar generator: www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/energy-economics/statistical-review-of-world-energy.html  REN21 has come up with equally high figures. And looking to the future, both see renewables booming, as does Bloomberg.

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